Nebraska Airmen train for today's warfight

Story by: Staff Sgt. Jason Wilson
Posted: 2/7/2018
CBRNE Training
Members of the 155th Civil Engineering Squadron attend a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosive, or CBRNE, refresher training course Feb. 4, 2018, at the Nebraska National Guard air base in Lincoln, Nebraska. During the course Airmen learn how to properly wear and utilize protective gear in case of a chemical attack, as well as identify possible chemical hazards. (Nebraska National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Jason Wilson)

​More than 20 members of Nebraska Air National Guard’s 155th Air Refueling Wing completed their chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosive, or CBRNE, refresher training course Feb. 4, 2018, at the Nebraska National Guard air base in Lincoln, Nebraska.


The Air Force recently mandated all Airmen be trained on CBRNE every 18 months instead of every three years. The training begins with online training followed by hands-on training.
Getting all Airmen up to speed will be challenging but useful in this era of defense.


“We have until March 31, to get 900 plus members trained," said Staff Sgt. Ryne S. Packett, an emergency management journeyman with the 155th Civil Engineering Squadron. “The reason why the training went from three years to 18 months is due to recent events in the world. With the confirmed chemical attacks and the increase in deployment cycles, we want to make sure that our Airmen know what they are doing and how to use the gear.”


To adhere to the new guidance, multiple training events will be offered to get as many people current as possible.


“The process isn’t set in stone, but the goal is to get as many Airmen as we can through the class so we can knock the numbers down,” Packett said. “We are holding two classes today and will potentially have classes during the upcoming weeks for full-time guard members. We also have a class of 100 plus members scheduled for April and a bigger one in June.”


The two-hour course builds upon the online CBRNE computer-based training and provides Airmen hands-on practice so they can walk away with knowledge of the chemical detection process and their personal protective equipment.


“Students will learn how to read liquid detection points with the M-9 paper to detect any chemicals in the air and how to use the auto injector atropines," Packett said. “However, the main focus is on Airmen learning how to correctly put on and seal their mask and suit so that they can survive a chemical attack.”